BluShift Aerospace pushed its performance limits Friday while launching its final rocket test of 2022.
A bluShift biofuel rocket launches from the former Loring Air Force Base in Limestone in Aroostook County on Jan. 31, 2021. Credit: The Knack Factory / bluShift Aerospace via AP

A Brunswick-based space company launched its largest test to date Friday, a project it hopes will launch the company deep into space.

BluShift Aerospace pushed its performance limits Friday while launching its final rocket test of 2022.

“We know that even with the engine as it stands now, we can make it to space,” CEO Sascha Deri said. “We just want to go farther.”

Deri said this is bluShift’s longest and largest test to date. He also sais bluShift is the only company in the country able to launch this test because of location.

It was the final run after more than 200 tests that were created to measure the efficiency, thrust and performance of bluShift’s MAREVL rocket engine.

The rocket test Friday was critical, giving bluShift information needed to advance rockets further into space.

Investors and other viewers came to see the final test.

“I’m just a fan of rockets, live in the area and I’ve been hearing about blueShift for a while,” space enthusiast Bailey Rahn said. “Just thought it would be neat to check out a 20-second duration test.”

The rocket launch was scheduled for 2 p.m., but the company said paragliders and airplanes caused a delay. Right after 3:30 p.m., it was a go.

Deri said the launch was a success, though his team still needs to go over the data from Friday’s launch to determine future tweaks.

One observation he had, however, was hoping for a cleaner burn.

“I don’t think we warmed up the night that much with that burn, so we’ll have to get more fuel next time,” Deri said.

The next test will likely be months away.