Credit: George Danby / BDN

Letters submitted by BDN readers are verified by BDN Opinion Page staff. Send your letters to letters@bangordailynews.com.

Time for D.C. statehood

It is taxation without representation. The 705,000 residents of Washington D.C. are taxed, but do not have voting representation in Congress. The population is more than that of Vermont.

Many organizations in Maine, such as the League of Women Voters, AFL-CIO, and the ACLU are in support of D.C. statehood. Reps. Jared Golden and Chellie Pingree support it. Why do not Sens. Angus King and Susan Collins?

I believe it is amoral and racist to deny D.C. residents statehood. The majority of residents are people of color and its residents are nearly 45 percent Black. In a 2016 referendum, 86 percent of residents voted for statehood. As it is a district, D.C. was allocated less COVID-19 relief money.

Since it is not a state, D.C. could not call the national guard for help during the Donald Trump-inspired insurrection on Jan. 6. How can our senators continue to go to work in D.C. knowing that those who cleaned up after the insurrection and those who protected them do not have representation? How much longer must the residents wait to have a voice in their democracy?

Collins and King should support S.51, the Washington D.C. Admission Act.

Samantha Le

Bangor

Cancer patients and COVID vaccine access

After the New York Times article about how cancer patients are being left behind in the COVID-19 vaccination criteria, I am hoping BDN will look into how the same thing may be happening in Maine.

The outcome of cancer patients is worse than a healthy 70-plus person, and cancer patients risk exposure because of the constant hospital trips for chemotherapy radiation and testing. There should be some way of prioritizing vaccinations by severity of health risks as well as the arbitrary age criteria.

Most cancer patients in active treatment are using everything they have just to survive cancer and need help so they don’t have to battle COVID, too.

Lezlie Belanger

Turner

Planning and work paying off

I recently had my first COVID-19 shot at the Cross Insurance Center. I would like to credit Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center and the Cross Center. What a great experience! From people assisting in the parking lot, to the gentleman who monitored the door, to the many volunteers manning the different stations, to the actual people giving the shot, to the lady who held the door and said “have a great day and thank you for coming” as we left.

All organized, friendly and very professional. From the time we walked in the door until the time we left with vaccine in arm, a total of 25 minutes (including a 15-minute wait after the vaccine). This took a lot of planning and work. And it showed. Thank you all. Very well done.

Sandra Sullivan

Millinocket

Common sense provides the answer

Why did Joe Biden basically campaign as “Blue Collar Joe” when his action has potentially eliminated thousands of high paying blue collar jobs? This is putting a stake in the heart of hard working middle-class American men and women. This is not going to stop climate change.

When John Kerry made the statement that workers can find jobs making solar panels, it tells us all we need to know. He and other career politicians are clueless and out of touch with reality.

With the stroke of a pen, the livelihoods of many Americans have been destroyed overnight. Does Biden understand when shutting down an industry, all the support jobs are shut down too? It’s a domino effect, an economic disaster. These jobs cannot be replaced by making “solar panels.”

So we must ask ourselves, why did Blue Collar Joe throw the blue collar worker under the bus? Does he really have their best interest at heart, or a political agenda to appease his donors and the liberals AOC’s in the world? Common sense gives us the answer.

Tonia Gilkey

Bangor