ORONO — The University of Maine Clinical Psychology Doctoral Training Program has received a national award for its multifaceted effort to recruit and retain more in-state students from diverse backgrounds.


The American Psychological Association of Graduate Students named UMaine the 2022 recipient of its Student Diversity Initiative Award, which includes $2,500 for the recruitment and retention project. Patricia Goodhines, an assistant professor of clinical psychology, and Liv Valö, a Ph.D. student who chairs the doctoral program’s graduate student Diversity Committee, are leading the effort in collaboration with other faculty and committee members.  

With the award funding, the project team will provide application fee waivers to six in-state clinical psychology program candidates from rural areas, Wabanaki tribal nations or other diverse backgrounds. Existing students will be hired to provide these applicants and additional diverse prospective students mentorship in the form of facility tours, lab shadowing and review of application materials.

The award also will support existing programming from the Diversity Committee, including the Stanley Sue Distinguished Diversity Lecture Series and other multicultural competency seminars and workshops for the campus community and general public.

“This award will support pathways to doctoral training for historically underrepresented communities in Maine, as well as empower students to become leaders in diversifying the field of clinical psychology,” says Goodhines, who also advises the Diversity Committee. “Cultural humility and inclusion are core values of the program, and this pilot project represents a continued commitment to expanding recruitment, retainment, and leadership opportunities for trainees from diverse backgrounds.”

UMaine’s nationally recognized and highly competitive Clinical Psychology Program prepares students for careers through both research and practice.

As part of their training, students provide psychological services to the public through internships, practicum and the university’s Psychological Services Center, the only training clinic in the state that provides low-cost and accessible mental health services to individuals of diverse identities facing various barriers to care.