That need for staying warm is going to run directly into rising costs as energy prices continue to rise.
In this Oct. 5, 2022, file photo, Lucinda Tyler and Aaron Raymo sit outside their home with fuel containers they used to fill their heating oil tank at their home in Jay. The couple shopped around for the best prices and bought heating oil 5 gallons at a time throughout the summer whenever they had any extra money. Credit: Robert F. Bukaty / AP

Maine has been experiencing unseasonably warm conditions this fall, but sooner or later the temperatures will drop as winter sets in. With that comes the reality of using more oil, propane, electricity or wood to heat living spaces and outbuildings on homesteads and farms.

That need for warmth is going to run directly into rising costs as energy prices continue to rise. We at the Bangor Daily News want to hear your questions about ways you can conserve those resources or on more cost-effective alternatives to those traditional fuels.

We’ll use your questions to inform future stories to help you stay warm in Maine this winter.

Help us guide our coverage by submitting your questions in the form below.

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Julia Bayly

Julia Bayly is a reporter at the Bangor Daily News with a regular bi-weekly column. Julia has been a freelance travel writer/photographer since 2000.